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Microsoft might make a shrunken Surface that fits in your pocket

Microsoft might make a shrunken Surface that fits in your pocket

Microsoft may have not delivered on a Surface Phone last night, but Microsoft’s Surface Chief Panos Panay promises the company’s working a pocketable Surface device and more.How can we be so sure? In an interview published today, Panay, Microsoft’s corporate vice president of Microsoft Devices Group, refers to a pocketable Surface device as being “absolutely my baby” before alluding to the existence of Surface devices in other form factors outside of the ones already available.While it seems like Panay affirms the existence of a much smaller Surface, Panay makes it sound like the devices arrival won’t be coming any time soon – as he stresses that Microsoft “can’t bring new categories into the world and not be a place where customers need it.”“I think any other form factor you haven’t seen yet we’ve gotta get right, we’ve got to make sure we keep inventing to make it perfect,” he said to The Verge. “I’m not talking about just the hardware, I’m talking about the whole thing. What it means to you, how it gives people the opportunity to be the best that they can be or transforms something they don’t do already.”The Surface Headphones is a clear representation that Microsoft isn’t afraid of venturing into new product categories as long as its products are novel. Case in point: the new Cortana-enabled headset features some gimmicks we’ve never seen before like rotating control dials and adjustable noise cancellation.

A modular Surface Studio?
In a second, related interview between Panay and The Verge, it seems Microsoft may have more modular devices in store for us.When pressed about the Surface Hub 2’s modular design trickling down to a future Surface Studio, Panay said “probably, you look at it and you see what’s the evolution and how do we make it better for our customer. there’s still so much more to do, and while I won’t tell you what it is you can put stories together.”While that’s basically a non-answer, it’s not a flat-out denial of its existence. There’s at least one Microsoft patent depicting a modular desktop computer according to The Verge.A modular design of the Surface Studio would be extremely welcome as it seems every version of it released so far is a generation or two behind the latest processors and graphics cards. This is especially true of the Surface Studio 2, which features Kaby Lake CPUs and Nvidia Pascal GPUs.
Here’s everything Microsoft announced during its Surface Event

All-black Surface Laptop pops up ahead of Microsoft’s October 2 event

All-black Surface Laptop pops up ahead of Microsoft’s October 2 event

Microsoft is expected to unveil a gaggle of refreshed Surface devices during its October 2 event, particularly sequels to Surface Laptop, Surface Studio and Surface Pro, but it might also have a brand new color scheme in the works. Leaked marketing images through Microsoft’s New Zealand events website have revealed what appears to be an all-black Surface Laptop. While the events page is inaccessible from other region, outlets like WindowsLatest have been able to rip images from the page as well as some telling words.“In April 2012, Microsoft launched the Surface RT, its sleek black chassis, detachable keyboard and integrated kickstand started a wave of innovation that has no signs of slowing down. Surface devices have inspired people to draw on their screens, work anywhere, collaborate across the world on 84-inch Hubs, crank the volume with dial and even float their all in one screen up and down with a zero gravity hinge. It is safe to say the devices have come a long way in 6 years.But in October 2018, Surface goes Back to Black.Come and join us at Studio 203, Ponsonby Road for a 45 minute Surface partner update followed by lunch & a chance to network with the Microsoft Modern Workplace team.”While this copy specifically refers to an event to be held in New Zealand, we seriously doubt that Microsoft would hold back such a redesign from the rest of the world. Judging by the leaked image, Microsoft will employ a black-painted aluminum on top of a black version of its Alcantara fabric keyboard deck.Here’s to hoping that A. this is true and B. that it’s not just for the Oceanic regions – and C. that this color scheme isn’t just for Surface Laptop 2, but Surface Pro 5 as well as Surface Studio 2.
These are the best Windows tablets we’ve tested this past yearVia MSPowerUser

The regional gap in AI adoption

The regional gap in AI adoption

To better understand how artificial intelligence (AI) is being adopted differently by nations around the world, we sat down with Virtusa’s Executive Vice President of Global Digital Solutions, Frank Palermo.
We’ve also highlighted the best AI platforms for business1. Is there much disparity between different global regions’ approaches to robotics, artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles or, indeed, their policies on these technologies?
As AI takes a more prevalent role in our society, the issue of ethics and governance has become critical, and policymakers around the globe have a collective responsibility to be forward thinking when deciding how best to regulate it. It is imperative that AI is managed in a way that allows the technology to reach its full potential, while ensuring it doesn’t have a negative impact on humans and society.The US has historically left technology companies relatively unimpeded by government oversight or stringent regulation, with the market dominance of the FAANG companies (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Alphabet’s Google) serving as a perfect example of this. While China has taken almost the opposite approach, with the Chinese government having a more ‘hands-on’ role, specifically mentioning AI in their ‘grand vision’ for the country, this has somehow still resulted in a similar ecosystem of tech giants, namely the BAT companies (Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent). Like America’s FAANGs, China’s BATs have established their own AI-dedicated labs, with Baidu in particular investing 15% of its revenue in R&D in AI related research.Elsewhere, Europe has a growing AI industry presence, inviting considerable attention from European regulators, though there is currently no overarching legislative approach towards AI in the region. Additionally, in the Middle East, attitudes towards AI are fairly liberal. For example, Saudi Arabia grabbed international headlines for granting citizenshipto Sophia (the AI robot) and the Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai launched the UAE Artificial Intelligence Strategy 2031 – aiming to enhance sectors like education, transportation, energy and space to achieve 100% reliance on AI for government services and data analysis by 2031.  
2. Can you comment on the investment environments in these different regions?
With the global business value derived from AI projected to total $1.2 trillion in 2018, it stands to reason that global investments in the technology continue to skyrocket.   China is aggressively investing in AI, with the country’s AI startups benefitting from government support as state agencies are directing capital to these companies. One such beneficiary, facial recognition startup Megvii, received a $460 million investment from a Chinese government-backed venture capital fund. 
3. What is your view on mature and emerging technologies within the AI sphere?
The field of AI is rapidly maturing due to the availability of data, data storage and compute power that is now readily available through cloud and API services. The technology has moved from simple back-office automation, revolutionising the way businesses interact with their customers.Voice-enabled digital assistants are a great example of this, having quickly become a staple in the consumer and home market. Expect to see more companies adopt virtual assistants to support people in their use of technology in the workplace, with the assistants developing more human characteristics in the future, and better interpreting context and meaning.The world of robotics is also changing, with robots becoming more sophisticated, mobile, collaborative and human friendly. This improved level of maturity has caused rapid expansion of robots into industries beyond manufacturing, including healthcare, service industries and transportation. Robotics were initially focused on improving efficiency and enabling greater productivity but now, the technology is beginning to address other global concerns such as skills shortages, workplace safety, and keeping up with the accelerating pace of business.
4. What are some of the areas causing uncertainty within AI?  Anything, perhaps, controversial?
There are many areas of uncertainty and controversy with regard to AI, with some even proving to be deadly. For example, if AI accidentally kills a human being, who is responsible? Last year, Tesla reported its first Autopilot fatality when its sensors did not detect the white side of a tractor trailer against a brightly lit sky. A controversial debate immediately surfaced on whether Tesla had to be held responsible for this. Similarly, there are concerns on how we can control the weaponising of AI. The United Nations recently discussed the use of autonomous weapons and the possibility to institute an international ban on “killer robots.”  There are also many questions surrounding how can we control AI from being unleashed in cyber-attacks. Last year, two data scientists from security firm ZeroFOX conducted an experiment to see who was better at getting Twitter users to click on malicious links: humans or artificial intelligence. The researchers taught an AI to study the behaviour of social network users, and then design and implement its own phishing bait. In tests, the artificial hacker was substantially better than its human competitors, composing and distributing more phishing tweets than humans, and with a substantially better conversion rate. These uses of AI and many others need to be carefully considered and regulated to protect humans and society from harm. To accomplish this, organisations must come together to discuss the proper governance and ethics mechanisms that must be implemented to minimise the risks of AI, while harnessing the full potential of this technology.
5. Finally, what will be the ultimate effect of AI?
AI-powered technology such as robotics and machine learning has already improved productivity and enhanced the economies of many nations, and will continue to do so. Future advancements will certainly have an even greater effect on some classes of jobs, though it is important to bear in mind that apocalyptic predictions of robot overlords are hyperbolic, and AI will also create jobs and roles we have not yet fully envisioned. Ultimately, AI is about improving human performance and intelligence, not replacing it.AI will be the battlefield of the future, with the successful deployment of the tech influencing how countries compete, shifting the balance of power in both the global economy and international relations. Countries that master AI first will have a crucial strategic advantage in writing the rules for the next global order. That’s why investing in AI is becoming a major initiative for both emerging and well-established economies.Frank Palermo is Executive Vice President – Global Digital Solutions at Virtusa
Also check out how to successfully implement an AI system 

Razer’s new Nari Ultimate gaming headset features ‘lifelike’ haptic feedback

Razer’s new Nari Ultimate gaming headset features ‘lifelike’ haptic feedback

Razer has pulled the curtain back on yet another line of PC gaming headsets, the Nari series. All three of these new gaming headsets come packing THX Spatial Audio, however, the ‘Ultimate’ version does something completely new: hyper-realistic haptic feedback.The feature, co-developed with German engineering firm Lofelt, uses haptic motion drivers to generate haptic feedback from all angles and dimensions. The goal of this is to drive deeper immersion in games and better in-game positional awareness. Better yet, this feature works across all audio formats and sources, from (obviously) video games to movies and music, converting audio signals into haptic ones automatically.
In addition to simulated surround sound through THX, the three new, over-ear gaming headsets – the Nari Essential ($99/€99), the Nari ($149/ €149) and the Nari Ultimate ($199/€199) – all share ear cushions with cooling gel inside, an automatically adjusting headband and ‘lag-free’ 2.4GHz wireless connectivity.The convenient chart above breaks down all of these product differences, and clearly Razer hopes you’ll gravitate toward the Nari Ultimate. Stay tuned for a full review of Razer Nari Ultimate to see whether it’s truly worth the relatively steep cost.
These are the best gaming keyboards we’ve tested in the past year

This PC boots to Windows 10 nearly five times as fast as an iPhone

This PC boots to Windows 10 nearly five times as fast as an iPhone

You could argue that the age of the smartphone is largely what has inspired PC, and especially laptop, manufacturers to make their devices faster. Now, our friends at Tom’s Hardware have taken this concept to its limit, building a computer that boots to Windows 10 in just 4.9 seconds.For the record, that’s nearly five times as fast as the time it took an iPhone XS in our offices to reach its home screen from a cold boot (hitting the power button when the system is completely off). Granted, these are two wildly different devices, but if smartphone-like boot times are what PC makers are after (i.e. Qualcomm and its partners) these days, Tom’s Hardware just tweaked the bar considerably. So, how did they do it?
Getting a PC to boot faster than an iPhone
The Tom’s Hardware team has detailed its journey to this lightning fast PC in a comprehensive article, but its strategy largely consists of three factors: the solid-state drive (SSD), the motherboard in use and overclocking the processor.First, the SSD in use here was the Intel Optane 905p (960GB), which Tom’s Hardware is now saying is the fastest SSD it has ever tested with these results as proof. This is a drive using the NVMe storage format, which Tom’s recommends for the fastest speeds (and we agree).Next, the motherboard is shown to have a massive impact on boot times through the work of Tom’s Hardware. There is so much preparation the motherboard needs to get through before the contents of your SSD, e.g. the operating system, even begin to load. However, not only did Tom’s Hardware use the ASRock Z370M Pro4 motherboard with Microsoft’s Fast Boot feature, but the team tweaked the motherboard to bypass certain checks it would normally make before beginning the OS boot process.Finally, the Tom’s Hardware overclocked the processor in use, the 3.7GHz Intel Core i7-8700K, way beyond its base clock speed to a whopping 5.1GHz, which shaved 0.57 seconds off of the boot time.So, while we definitely won’t be seeing laptops, PCs or even smartphones that boot in under five seconds regularly anytime soon, leave it to Tom’s Hardware to show us that it’s possible and therefore raised the bar.
These are the best PCs we’ve tested this year

The best and worst bits of macOS 10.14 Mojave

The best and worst bits of macOS 10.14 Mojave

Apple has finally launched macOS Mojave unto the world, free for (almost) all who own a Mac laptop or desktop. The new operating system (OS) brings a lot of exciting new features – namely a new Dark Mode – but also, unsurprisingly, a few new bugbears.Every new OS comes energized with new tools and optimization, as well as its share of disappointments and at times even controversies. Apple’s macOS 10.14 is no different, save for the controversy: none of that … yet.So, join us as we highlight the best parts of Apple’s new OS for you to enjoy as well as the worst parts of the upgrade that you’ll probably hate.
Here’s how to download and install macOS Mojave right now
Best bit: Dark Mode
The most widely publicized feature of macOS Mojave is deservedly so. The expansion of Dark Mode in macOS 10.14 is a breath of fresh air, especially for those with sensitive eyes. Combine this with the existing Night Shift mode that warms color temperatures, and work just got a lot easier on the eyes.
Worst bit: Dark Mode
What’s one person’s treasure is another’s trash, to flip an idiom for our own purposes. We’ve heard coworkers in the TechRadar offices actually complain about Dark Mode. This apparently makes text more difficult to read for these users, making the feature a bit of a double-edged sword. At any rate, at least it’s just an option.

Best bit: Stacks
In one fell swoop, we think Apple may have finally cracked the code on automated desktop management. Without the user doing anything to fix their abject mess of files and folders on their desktop, Stacks comes in a tidies everything up by file category. Stacks are not even technically folders, so your organized chaos remains in tact … it’s just more manageable now.
Worst bit: No more social media integration
While many a folk out there will see this as a godsend, some of us here at TechRadar are actually lamenting the removal of social media account integration from macOS. This move was made as a follow-up to a similar one Apple made regarding social media integration on iOS. Being able to post and see notifications straight to and from the service, respectively, is something we’ll miss a bit for what Apple claims are “privacy concerns.”

Best bit: Screenshots
Command-Shift-4 was already our most-used Mac keyboard shortcut by a long shot, and now it looks like that will change to Command-Shift-5. This new shortcut activates the new screenshot tool within macOS, which contains a menu full of options including saving destinations, screen video recording, setting start timers and more. Our most important Mac function just became that much more vital.
Worst bit: smaller device support
The move from macOS 10.12 Sierra to 10.13 High Sierra saw very little, if any, change in the amount of Mac laptop and desktop models that supported the new operating system. However, Apple’s changes to the interface with 10.14 Mojave apparently require beefier hardware, as the list of supported devices has shrunk considerably. Now, you’ll need to have bought a Mac device in 2012 or 2013 (depending on the model) to enjoy these changes. We can’t expect our Mac hardware to be supported forever, and this is still remarkably extensive for legacy device support. Nevertheless, it’s a tough pill to swallow if you’ve been holding onto that plastic MacBook for dear life.
Here are the best Macs to date

40 years of the laptop: how mobile PCs changed the world

40 years of the laptop: how mobile PCs changed the world

Main image: The IBM ThinkPad 700 series first appeared in 1992If you own a PC there’s a very good chance it’s a lightweight and portable laptop, rather than a big and bulky desktop. Those rectangular boxes that are tethered to your desk have been declining in popularity, with laptops now far outstripping them when it comes to sales.Thanks to an almost constant stream of innovations, the humble laptop has become slimmer and lighter than ever before, while the hardware inside them has become ever-more powerful, while batteries are lasting longer.Creating a powerful and portable computer is no mean feat, and here we look back at some of the pivotal moments in the history of laptop development, and examine how early machines influenced the laptops of today.
1981: Osborne 1, the world’s first truly mobile computer
Image credit: CC BY 3.0Many people consider the Osborne 1 to be the granddaddy of laptops. Released by Osborne Computer in 1981, the Osborne 1 had a five-inch screen, two floppy drives, a modem, battery pack and a keyboard that was built into the lid.Although it was big and bulky (it weighed 11kg, which is just over the combined weight of five MacBook Pros), this early computer still has some recognizable laptop features. Sadly, it wasn’t a hit, but it showed the potential of a portable personal computer – for the first time, people were able to carry their computer with them and work on them when traveling.At the time of its release it cost $1,795, which would be around $5,000 (£4,000, AU$7,000) in today’s money.
1983: Grid Compass 1101, the first clamshell laptop
Image credit: Russian Vintage Laptop MuseumThe first portable laptop that really looked like a laptop was the Grid Compass 1101, which was released in 1983. It featured the clamshell design, with the screen able to be folded up against the keyboard when closed. This remarkable innovation meant that the Grid Compass 1101 could be more easily carried around, while the screen and keyboard were kept protected.It was such a successful and influential design that it’s endured to this day, and while the Grid Compass 1101 itself wasn’t a huge success due to its high price of around $10,000 (around $25,000 / £20,000 / AU$35,000 in today’s money), the patents on many of its innovations earned GRID Systems Corp a lot of money.
1989: Compaq LTE and Compaq LTE 286, the first notebook PCs
Image credit: Source Centre for Computing History Up until this point, early laptops were sometimes referred to as ‘luggables’, due to the fact that while they were more portable than a regular PC, they were still large and bulky, and not easily carried.However, in 1989 the Compaq LTE and LTE 286 were released, and they’re generally regarded as the first notebook PCs, as they were around the size of a paper notebook. These smaller laptops were easier to carry around, making them more popular with people who travelled a lot.They were also two of the first laptops to include a built-in hard drive and floppy disk drive, making them even more versatile. The hard drive in the Compaq LTE offered 20MB of storage space, which was doubled for the Compaq LTE 286.
1989: Macintosh Portable, the first Apple laptop
Image credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 FR1989 also saw Apple release its first laptop device, and while it wasn’t as small or as easy to carry as the Compaq LTE (it was still considered a ‘luggable’ device), it offered very good battery life and decent screen – something modern MacBooks are still renowned for.Due to its size and weight it wasn’t a popular device, but it did spur on competitors to release Mac-compatible laptops that were more portable – these days it’s strange to think of any other company other than Apple building Mac hardware.
1991: Apple PowerBook 100 series: a revolutionary early laptop
Image credit: CC BY-SA 3.0In 1991, Apple released a series of PowerBook laptops – the PowerBook 100, PowerBook 140 and PowerBook 170 – which were far more successful than the company’s previous attempts at creating a portable PC, and they ushered in a number of revolutionary features that have become staples of modern laptop design.For example, the keyboard was positioned towards the back of the bottom half of the laptop, providing room at the front for palm rests and a trackball. Up until that point most laptops had the keyboard positioned at the front, with the space at the back for function key reference cards and instructions.The included trackpad was also noteworthy, as it provided a convenient way of controlling a pointing device. With operating systems moving away from text-only command line interfaces to graphical user interfaces, these pointing devices would become pivotal.The Apple PowerBook series was immensely popular, and over the years the PowerBook line brought in more innovative features that we now take for granted in laptops. In 1994, the PowerBook 500 series was the first laptop to include a true touchpad, and the first to include a built-in Ethernet network adapter.
1992: IBM ThinkPad 700 – a powerful and iconic laptop
In 1992 IBM released its first ThinkPad laptops, the 700, 700c and 700t, and these, along with the Apple PowerBook 100 series, can be considered some of the first modern laptops, helping to shape the laptop landscape for the next 25 years. The ThinkPad came with a red TrackPoint in the middle of the keyboard, which was used to control the pointer, and the iconic feature is still found in modern ThinkPads.The ThinkPad 700 also really showcased what a laptop device could be capable of. It had a full-color 10.4-inch display, which was larger than any laptop screen that had come before, a 120MB hard drive and a powerful IBM 486 SLC processor.The design of the ThinkPad was both stylish and functional, and it won a host of design awards. IBM was keen to highlight how well built the ThinkPad was in a series of promotional events, with, for example, the laptops being used by archaeologists in Egypt. The ThinkPad 750c was taken into space by NASA, proving just how capable these modern laptops were.With innovative features and design choices used to overcome the technological issues of the time, these early laptops paved the way for the modern machines we now use daily, and it’s these early pioneers we have to thank for making laptops the brilliantly versatile devices we have in our homes, schools and workplaces.
TechRadar’s Next Up series is brought to you in association with Honor

The impact of blockchain

The impact of blockchain

Blockchain is revolutionising the world as we know it today. While it was originally designed to facilitate the transfer of cryptocurrencies, it is no longer solely connected to fintech. Nearly every industry is benefiting from the technology, from the public sector to healthcare and the travel industry. With World Blockchain Forum hosted in London two weeks ago, and Blockchain Live coming up later this month, September has proven to be the month of the fintech. Not just in the UK, but all over the world. We have been seeing more and more blockchain based conferences and forums hosted, while the technology’s influence is an increasingly hot topic in international media. Investoo Group, one of the largest financial lead generation companies in the world, has therefore decided to share insights into 5 ways blockchain technology is impacting society. 
We’ve also highlighted five markets that blockchain will transform1. Multinational corporations adopting blockchain
As influential multinational corporations such as EY and IBM adapt digital currency payment networks, they solidify the fact that blockchain is not going anywhere in the near future.  Leading businesses are no longer able to ignore its crucial benefits, especially within the financial sector. With some companies still experimenting with the technology through program testing, others have proudly integrated it into their systems including JPMorgan and Microsoft. 
2. The growth of global acceptance
We have also seen more sceptical nations including China and Iran beginning to be more open towards the technology.  Even though China has expressed previous reservations on cryptocurrency,  The People’s Bank of China has now adopted the testing phase of their trade finance blockchain platform. Iran has also accepted crypto mining as an industry earlier this month. 
3. Impacting the UN’s sustainable goals
Proving it’s crucial global impact, blockchain is helping leading organisation the United Nations, reach their sustainable development goals by 2020.  Influential UN programmes are experiencing hugely beneficial advancements in their technology including the World Food Programme’s Building Block. 100,000 Syrian refugees in Pakistan and Jordan have successfully received assistance through the programme as of January 2018 according to the Forbes Technology Council.  
4. Revolutionizing healthcare 
Blockchain provides major advantages for the healthcare sector, which has actively integrated it in their data record systems. Thanks to such advancements, a higher standard of healthcare could be developed within the sector. From enhancing the ability to collect and analyse medical data, to ensuring the secure privacy of individuals’ records, the technology provides critical improvements and developments. 
5. Influencing the travel industry
Blockchain has successfully advanced into the global travel industry.  Many airlines and hotel companies, including Lufthansa and citizenM hotels, have incorporated its technology while dealing with customer transactions. Luggage may be tracked in a more simplified way thanks to blockchain, while rapidly speeding up identification services, saving time and increasing efficiency. 
Based on the above, we expect the technology’s global influence to continue to grow and expand as the innovation becomes an authoritative figure in problem-solving processes across all industries. David Merry, CEO of Investoo Group 
Interested in blockchain? Check out the HTC Exodus, the world’s first blockchain smartphone

New AMD Ryzen H Series processors look primed for gaming laptops

New AMD Ryzen H Series processors look primed for gaming laptops

AMD has released two new Ryzen processors designed for high-end laptops with lots of room for more power, especially when it comes thermal capacity. These processors begin a new H Series line of parts for AMD, much similar to Intel’s own H Series of mobile chips.These two new processors, known as the AMD Ryzen 5 2600H and Ryzen 7 2800H, are both still quad-core chips with base clock speeds and thermal design power (TDP) brought way up in comparison to their U Series predecessors. (You’ll also see a minor increase in GPU cores between 2700U and 2800H.)However, maximum frequencies remain unaffected across the board. For instance, the Ryzen 5 2500U and Ryzen 7 2700U are clocked at 2GHz and 2.2GHz to start, and both max out at 3.6GHz and 3.8GHz, respectively. Comparatively, the Ryzen 5 2600H and Ryzen 7 2800H have much higher base clock speeds of 3.2GHz and 3.3GHz, respectively, but max out at the same speeds.The higher TDP thresholds that both of these processors require – 45W compared to just 25W from previous models – could leave room for beefier discrete graphics and memory, not to mention stronger encoding performance from the CPUs themselves.Of course, AMD hasn’t said anything yet regarding laptops ready for market with these chips inside. One thing we do know already is that, to house these processors, those laptops are going to be a little bigger than the Ryzen-toting laptops we’ve seen thus far.
These are the best processors we’ve tested to dateVia ExtremeTech

Healthcare leads the way when it comes to AI investment

Healthcare leads the way when it comes to AI investment

New research has revealed that the healthcare industry is leading the charge when it comes to the development of artificial intelligence (AI) research and applications.In its latest report, CB Insights explores the latest AI trends in healthcare and how Google, Apple and other tech giants are innovating in the space.For example, Google’s DeepMind is revolutionising diagnostics by matching the accuracy of medical experts in diagnosing 50 sight-threatening eye diseases while pharmaceutical companies are employing deep learning to help design new drugs.
Interested in AI? We explore the 10 most important breakthroughs in artificial intelligenceHurdles for AI in healthcare
CB Insights highlights overhauling current processes that no longer work as one of the biggest hurdles for AI in healthcare. The emerging technology faces both technical and feasibility challenges that are unique to the healthcare industry such as the fact that there is no standard format or central repository of patient data in the US.When patient files are faxed, emailed as unreadable PDFs or set as images of handwritten notes, it will be quite difficult for AI to extract useful information. However, Apple and other big tech companies have the advantage here as they are familiar with onboarding a large network of partners including healthcare providers and EHR vendors.The company’s ResearchKit and CareKit could transform clinical studies by generating new sources of data and putting EHR data in patients’ hands.CB Insights utilised its database to uncover the trends that are transforming the healthcare industry and the entire 33-page report can be downloaded here.
We’ve also highlighted the best AI platforms for business